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Persepolis

Persepolis is a symbol of Iran’s glory

in 518 BCE, a number of the most experienced engineers, architects, and artists have been called on from the quadrilateral of the universe to engage and think through the first building that could symbolize global unity, peace, and equality for thousands of years. Parseh, Persepolis, Police wanders, thousand pillars or forty menars, the magnificent capital of the kingdom of Iran during the Achaemenid Empire, and for about 50 years, was the center for ritual ceremonies and celebrations, especially Nowruz

The construction of the Persepolis under the rule of Dariush, his son Xerxes, and his son-in-law, Ardeshir I, continued, and each of them added parts to the collection, but in fact the construction of Persepolis until 188, until the end of the Achaemenid rule in 330 BCE continued.

Persepolis’s suite consists of seven halls (palaces), embossed reliefs, stairs, columns and two stone shrines, and there are more than 3,000 outstanding embossments in buildings and tombstones that are strikingly in harmony with each other.

We suggest to introduce this immortal legacy to Darius (Darius in the language of Elamite) and other Achaemenid kings with the us.

Apadana palace

Among the palaces of Persepolis, the Apadana Palace has been more ancient and glorious. The construction of this palace began on the order of Darius around 515 BC and lasted thirty years. The Apadana Palace has an area of 3660 square meters; its main hall has 36 columns and there are 12 columns in the east, west and north.

The most important designs of Persepolis, engraved on the steps of the eastern porch, which seemed to have originally been the main entrance of the palace. The height of Apadana’s columns is about twenty meters high and very strong, so that until the Qajar era, still 13 columns were raised.

Hadish Palace

Hadish means a high place, and since the name of the second wife of Xerxes was Hadish, this palace was also named. The Palace of Hadish is located in the southernmost and highest part of the Persepolis, and has been the private palace of Xerxes. The palace is connected to the Queen’s Palace through two sets of stairs Hadish Palace.

Queen’s Palace

The queen’s palace is built by Xerxes and is located at a lower altitude than other buildings. Part of the palace was excavated and renovated in 1931 by renowned Orientalist Professor Ernest Emil Hertzfeld, and today it has been used as the museum and the central office of the Persepolis.

Palace H

The Hell’s Palace is one of the Jamshid Palace’s halls, located southwest of the flat and west of the Hadish Palace. The staircase leading from this side to the palace is now half-ruined.

Three palaces

The Palace of the Three, the Shura Hall, the Kings gate, the three gates, the three doors or the central palace, is located in the center of Persepolis’s shrine. The 3rd palace is located in three palaces and several corridors, and thus it is called the Central Palace or the Three Doors. Due to the palace’s palace, the Persian noblemen have been involved in a friendly and unofficial manner for visiting the ruler, and also due to the type of use and position of the palace, they have also called it the Council Hall.

The palace of a hundred pillars

Another important palace of Persepolis is the one hundred pillar palace, built by Xerxes, dating back to about 470 BC, and lasted twenty years. The palace with a total area of 4,700 square meters is the largest palace in Persepolis, with 16 columns in the north. The height of the pillars of the palace was 14 meters and it was completed at the time of Ardeshir I.

Council palace

The king would probably discuss with the elders here, and with regard to the carved sculptures, the king entered one of the gates and left the other two gates. Hence, this palace is called shura, with two columns in the head of man in this palace, and in other palaces there are no such columns.

Naghshe rostam

It is located 6.5 km from Persepolis, a place where the Shrine’s Tomb such as Darius the Great, Xerxes, Artaxeres I and Darius II was left, and the fifth tomb remained semi-preserved, which probably belongs to Darius III.

At the top of the main staircase, there is the gate of the nations, with the inscription written in three languages: Ancient Persian, Elamite, and Babylon.

Persepolis Museum

The Persepolis Museum is the oldest building in Iran that has been renovated and dedicated to the museum, which includes a porch, two galleries and a hall.

The ceiling of the porch holds eight wooden columns with heads of two-headed cow pillars. The Persepolis Museum opened on May 28, 2002, coincides with the International Museum Day.

Persepolis’s collection has been recognized as one of the Fars province records in the UNESCO World Heritage List since 1979. This collection is packed with wonderland and brilliant culture, and even its ruins and ruins today are admired by Iranian and non-Iranian viewers after 2500 years.

But the question that is posed by the visitation of this magnificent building in the minds of any viewer is the question of how the Persepolis was destroyed and why it was destroyed during its period of steadfastness.


Source: Eghamat24

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